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in a recession in previous decades, might not be a bad thing. >>> detroit's bankruptcy has sent off a huge legal battle over pensions that it owes its workers. many other american cities have so-called underfunded pensions. some are leaning on taxpayers to make up the difference. i'll show you how charleston, west virginia, is raising revenues and cutting costs so it can pay its pensions. >> reporter: the city is about to impose .005 cents sales tax and is charging everyone a $2 a week fee. >> we've got that story and much more as real money continues. keep it right here. antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo with unexpected opinions and a fresh outlook. including yours. >> bankruptcy hearings resumed in detroit and has folks i with underfunded pensions worried. that's forcing some local governments to turn to taxpayers who were not supposed to be on the hook for pensions to shell out more money. reporting on one west virginia city taking extraordinary steps to stay out of bankruptcy and to keep those pensioners paid. >> reporter: charleston, west virginia, fi
to death. >>> and dogs running wild in detroit. the new problem facing america's largest bankrupt city. >>> and honey booboo's big day. [ male announcer ] this store knows how to handle a saturday crowd. ♪ [ male announcer ] the parking lot helps by letting us know who's coming. the carts keep everyone on the right track. the power tools introduce themselves. all the bits and bulbs keep themselves stocked. and the doors even handle the checkout so we can work on that thing that's stuck in the thing. [ female announcer ] today, cisco is connecting the internet of everything. so everyone goes home happy. >>> our second story outfront, the decision to go to war. president obama said tonight he has not yet determined whether or not to strike syria but he did lay out his justification for u.s. involvement. >> when you start talking about chemical weapons in a country that has the largest stock pile of chemical weapons in the world where over time their control over chemical weapons may erode, where they lied to terrorist organizations that have targeted the united states, then there is a
. >> other playoff baseball the tampa bay rays lost to the angels. oakland beat detroit. braves won again and the pirates lost to the brewers. >> come on pirates. >> went 3 for 4, two rbis in my softball game. >> you laid down a couple doubles? >> i hit a couple, no one. >> did they bring out the respirator? >>> let's go to the u.s. open. 296th ranked victoria duval stunned samantha stoeser. it is her first win against a top 20 opponent. her family comes from haiti. her father was actually buried in the rubble in the earthquake three years ago and had to be dug out of the rubble. >> that's an incredible story. >>> more drama from the new york jets camp. the team signed former green bay packers quarterback. he was released after losing out to vince young in green bay for the number two spot. harrell expected to report with the team today. another quarterback joins on the jets roster. rex says he may not make anyone a starter until opening day, day of the game. bring in more quarterbacks. >>> still ahead on "morning joe" governor rick snyder joins us ahead of tomorrow's special show in detr
people may not know his speech originated in part in detroit. explain what dr. king was saying two months before. guest: yes, i'm from detroit and i grew up there. with aretha franklin's father and many other prominent ministers in detroit. dr.king participated in a huge march in detroit leading down near cobal hall where he delivered a similar speech and he talked about using our resources to make sure justice will be delivered. he talked about some of the same things he did in washington. he also talked about obviously detroit being the headquarters of a tremendous labor movement with u.a.w. the local focus in terms of negro rights was extraordinarily powerful. so dr. king founded some of those things but of course took them to a new level in washington. host: from june of 1963 two months before the march on washington. this is put together from motown records. >> i have a dream this afternoon. my four little children will not come up in the same young days that i came up. they will be judged on the basis of the content of their character and not the color of their skin. i have a dre
-free municipal bond, but does detroit give you cause for concern? and other cities across the country that are in similar condition? >> well, i wouldn't touch the cities. you've got to do your homework. so, cities, whether it is harrisburg or detroit or stockton, california, they're are a number of cities you've got to get under the hood and look at the credits but if you look at the highest grade, quality tax-free bond today, they're out there with the yields between 4 and 5% and they're not city credits. they're not detroit's. when that analysis is done, at our present tax structure the taxable equivalent yield is about nine. where are you going to get nine in a liquid investment of very high credit quality? i don't see very much of it. so we shifted allocation to tax-free bond. ashley: very good. do your homework. always good advice. david kotok, thank you so much for joining us. we appreciate it. >> thank you. lori: let's take a specific look at the market because the gains thus far are evaporating slightly. lauren simonetti joins us from the floor of the stock exchange. you're wa
detroit. >> right. >> well, detroit is a great symbol of failure. anyway, thank you, glenn thrush. thanks for giving us the idea for the piece. what he is going took tomorrow about economic inequality, not just racial inequality. >>> up next, bachmann's stand. we're talking about michele bachmann. a new ebook just came out. more trouble for her. her staff is in revolt. even her own people on coming out against her on her way out. this is "hardball," the place for politics. >>> just a day before the 50th anniversary of the march on washington, how much progress has this country made toward reaching dr. martin luther king's vision of racial equality? well, it all depends upon who you ask. 56% of republicans but just 38% of democrats say the country has made a lot of progress. the difference in opinion has a lot to do with the political makeup of the two parties, as we can imagine. 48% of whites say a lot of progress has been made. only 32% of african-americans agree. that explains a lot in the party difference. and we'll be right back. >>> we are back. ♪ honey, we need to talk. we do? i t
'donnell. would rain put a damper on the a's it detroit? and get your tape measures out. this was big in dinver. wait until you see -- in denver. wait until you see it coming up. ,, ,,,,,,,,,,,, unbelievable. shhhhh! in our day, we didn't have u-verse high speed internet. yeah, our babysitter didn't have a million ways to serve mom up on a silver platter. we had to count sheep to fall asleep. and i always worried that i was creating an overcrowded sheep farm. in my head... never looked like that farmer took proper care of those sheep. too much? a little. [ male announcer ] connect all your wi-fi-enabled devices with u-verse high speed internet. and got an unexpected visita 350 pound blue marlin that t >>> a close call in the dominican republic where fishermen hooked a 350-pound blue marlin that leaped on the boat nearly spearing a crew member. they usually release the marlins but because this died on board the crew gave it to a local fisherman. >> that was a close call, though. >> wow. >>> good morning, everybody. justin verlander beat the a's twice in the play-offs last year. well, last night
is assessing facebook. >> and i'm dennis o'donnell. would rain put a damper on the a's' bats in detroit? get your tape measures out. this was big in denver. wait until you see it coming up. >> what's cool about your school? you can submit your nomination at our website, kpix.com/coolschool. we may come out and feature your school on the show. we'll be right back. >>> good morning, everybody. justin verlander beat the a's twice in the play-offs last year. well, last night redemption and a chance to up their wild card lead. verlander needed 44 pitches to get out of the 1st inning alone. he wasn't good. brandon moss would agree. tied at 3 in the 5th inning moss launches one the other way off the former american league mvp. a's take a 5-3 lead. they had the baze loaded nobody out in the --bases loaded nobody out in the 6th inning. the rain started falling. the game was called and the a's will take it. they win 6-3. two straight now over detroit. >>> hunter pence almost sent himself to the disabled list crashing into the wall a couple of days ago. last night he hits the longest home run in the ma
, he did one in 1960 to '61. another in detroit. so he put them all together to deliver this incredible message that moved the nation and our world. >> that crescendo that came at the end, that build, the speech was kind of prosaic, then he started talking my country 'tis of thee from the song. and the references to the bible and shakespeare. "the new york times" today pointed out -- people are going to be studying this for years. the source material of the bible, of shakespeare, of woody guthrie, of the declaration and documents all enriching that one statement. in 17 minutes. >> i mean, that's the brilliance of it. that was the brilliance of who he as an orator was. and "i have a dream" is probably one of the most well-known speeches on the planet. >> around the world. >> around the world. unquestionably. and i think certainly today represented some of that. with all the coverage from rural networks. i've done so many things from bbc that i've ever done in my life. but because of the importance of this message. >> what's it like when you hear him say on tape again my four little child
in detroit to stand with those to make a difference in what was happening in the south. >> so you drove from detroit with your mom, came down here. what was this like? 50 years ago, when this mall was filled with, you were one of a quarter of a million americans. >> actually we took the greyhound bus. it was a wonderful experience. it was a very, very hot humid day but it was so incredible to see so many people fro all walks of life all standing together in unity after havg heard so many disturbances. buthere was no fr that there would be anything happening because everyone shared the same goal. >> well, it's 50 years later. it's your birthday again and now you came from detroit, drove from detroit, with your granddaughte granddaughters, why. >> i drove because i wanted my granddaughters to have the experience that i had 50 years ago. so they'll have the same kind of hope that i have for what we're facing in today's associate. >> what are your thoughts about this? you have seen the videos. you have talked to your grandmother. what are you looking forward to today? >> i'm looking forward to s
mother understood that we lived in the north in detroit michigan, where i live now. she and i knew, from reading different obligations, like jet , about newspaper different disturbances in the south. remember seeing the picture of major adverse, after he had been killed -- medger evers after he had been killed. i went to integrated schools and lived in a integrated neighborhood. my friends were white and black, all through school. it disturbs my mother and me that people in the south had problems and could not live the life that i lived. they went to lunch counters and took public transportation. we would get on the bus. ride wherever we need to go and sat wherever we want to set. -- sit. coming to the march meant supporting the travesties that were happening in the south. just my mother and i. 250,000 people felt the same way. many who watched from their tvs and homes. it felt the same way and could not get there. thatew and understood america is a democracy and they're supposed to be freedom. there is not freedom. we have to unite and stand together as a child, i was 12 .ears old you c
detroit, michigan, which is where i live now, but she knew and i knew from reading different publications like "jet." our black newspaper was then called "the michigan chronicle." i remember vividly seeing the picture of mr. evers after he had been killed. but growing up in the north, in detroit, i lived the dream that dr. king spoke of. i went to integrated schools. i lived in an integrated neighborhood. my friends were both white and black, all through school. it disturbed my mother and it disturbs me that people in the south had problems, they could not live the life that i lived. we dined at lunch counters and took public transportation in contrast to what you heard about rosa parks and others. we rode on the bus -- it was called the dsr then. and we would ride wherever we wanted to go and sit wherever we wanted to sit. coming to the march for us meant supporting the travesties that were happening in the south. and not just my mother and i, obviously. 250,000 people felt the same way. those that could get there. there were many who watched from their tv's at home that felt the same wa
momentarily. i am from detroit. i lost my parents at an early age. brother.raise a i was able to go to school and i graduated out of high school at 16. i was able to get an associates degree. i found work at a hospital. our kids need be education. month.be 54 next i have been sick all my life. my family came from tennessee. they always fought. >> vivian, what stood out today? what speech or comment? >> what did you say? >> diane black, ok? i am black, ok? they did not want us to take welfare. they taught us to be independent. you calling ine and sharing your story. to facebook, you can see a lot of the video on facebook. here is a comment. w bush and george w. bush declined to participate because they have health issues. george w. bush did release a statement earlier today that read -- the statement from former president george w. bush, who recently had some heart treatment. let's go to mississippi. laura from ocean springs, mississippi. i am 45 years old. when barack obama talked about education. they discussed how blacks and whites could not go to the same school. thes a graduate from unive
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13

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